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Tuition Rates

Tuition rates for Purdue and Indiana University are established by their respective boards of trustees and are subject to change. Financial aid is available.

Indiana University Program Tuition

Indiana University's Kelley Executive Degree Program rate is $1,145 per credit hour. This cost includes tuition and additional fees, and hotel accommodations in Bloomington, Ind. It also includes breakfasts, lunches and some dinners.

Purdue University Program Tuition

Purdue's rate for the MS-MBA program is $1,165 per credit hour. It covers tuition and fees, hotel accommodations, breakfasts, lunches and some dinners for the all Purdue residency sessions, including the international residency.

Payment

Tuition for the MS-MBA program is invoiced by each school separately. IU tuition must be paid upon receipt of invoice. Purdue tuition must be paid prior to the start of each Purdue module or late fees will apply.

Additional Costs

Transportation to residency sessions, including the international residency location, are not covered in tuition. Textbooks and course materials are also not covered. Textbooks are estimated to cost $100-$200 per module.

Financial Aid

For information on applying for domestic financial aid, please visit our financial aid page. Typically foreign students are not eligible for Title IV federal student aid, making private loans the only option. If the student holds an eligible non-citizen status, they may qualify for federal aid.

  Have you ever felt like you just wanted to get your graduate degree done as soon as possible? Have that feeling that your dream program is “holding you back” because you have not been out of your undergrad program long enough? If so, you and I are alike. I was so charged up to get an MBA on my resume that I didn’t take “no” for an answer. The result … 24 months later I had  ... READ MORE  

Ben Smith

Solutions Accelerator Pilot Program Lead - NavCom Technology, Inc., A John Deere Company
MS-MBA Class of 2008-2010

  Have you ever felt like you just wanted to get your graduate degree done as soon as possible? Have that feeling that your dream program is “holding you back” because you have not been out of your undergrad program long enough? If so, you and I are alike.

I was so charged up to get an MBA on my resume that I didn’t take “no” for an answer. The result … 24 months later I had accomplished a degree. But, in my rush to achieve something, I did just that. I achieved a degree from a program that was less selective and ultimately less credible in the eyes of my employer. While I learned a few things from the program, I realized only a marginal lift in roles, responsibility and income. That left this “life-long learner” again looking for more.

I found my “more” in my aforementioned dream program, which I enrolled in eight years after I originally tried to get in. My drive for more has been rewarded after completing my dream program, the MS-MBA in Food and Agribusiness. Since then, I have been promoted twice, both times increasing my roles and responsibly and gaining international business exposure.

Here are the lessons I learned the hard way:
1. Less selective programs that don’t have business experience requirements are not all bad, but often lack veteran candidates. I realized that the material taught by the instructors is only part of the program. An additional factor, which can make or break your experience, is the set of students you complete the program with.
2. Being a team player is important in a graduate program. The best way to be a team player is to be able to provide real-world insight from multiple years of business experience. This is not found in a textbook, a podcast or at the lunch table surrounded by senior executives. You have to gain this the old-fashioned way. Earn it.
3. Be selective. If you ask my parents, I have always been in a hurry. This drive has benefited me in some aspects of life, but not so much in the speeding ticket department, or when I had to retake business statistics because I wanted a better MBA. If I had been more selective when choosing a graduate program the first time around, I would not have had to endure that pain. On the bright side, I did some cross-referencing between my less selective MBA program and the one I recently completed. Let’s take finance, for example. The entire finance material covered in the less selective MBA program was covered within the first third of the Indiana University course. The remainder of the class provided me with a great deal more insight, and personally useful information, that has helped me further my career.

So, take it from me—all graduate programs are not the same. If I can help one person not make the same mistakes I did, I will be happy.  

Ben Smith

Solutions Accelerator Pilot Program Lead - NavCom Technology, Inc., A John Deere Company
MS-MBA Class of 2008-2010