Internet and e-Commerce Use by Agribusiness Firms: 2004

From Journal of Agribusiness - In 2001, the dot.com bubble burst and U.S. e-commerce growth slowed. Slower e-commerce growth may signal changes in the use and perceptions of the Internet and e-commerce in agribusiness companies. Agribusiness firm managers were surveyed in 2004 to identify agribusiness use of the Internet and e-commerce and to solicit their perceptions about the Internet and e-commerce. The survey was developed from a similar survey conducted in 1999. In 2004, agribusiness firms were using e-commerce more with their suppliers than with their customers. Perceptions regarding Internet and e-commerce varied by the intensity of e-commerce use. Given the variety of opinions regarding the Internet and e-commerce, e-commerce capabilities in the agribusiness industry will remain highly diverse in the near term.

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