Employees as Assets

Allan Gray, the center’s director, recently sat down with us to discuss how agribusinesses should think about investing in their employees during an industry downturn. Below, Allan Gray shares:

  • Why you shouldn’t be so fast to cut professional development from the budget
  • How to view learning as something other than a cost on the balance sheet
  • How to position your people to be more capable of handling a different market environment
  • How the changing market environment will affect farmer buying decisions

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