The Agricultural Outlook for 2015

Recently, Mike Boehlje sat down with us to talk about the future of the ag industry. See what he has to say about agriculture’s changing business climate and the future of land values and interest rates.

What does the business climate look like for the agricultural sector for the next couple of years? (2:18)

 

What about the cost side of crop production—will input prices decline? (2:51)

 

Are land values going up or down? (1:57)

 

How are lenders reacting to this downturn? (4:19)

 

When will interest rates go up? (3:26)

 

What are the prospects for the food and agricultural sector in the long run? (4:15)

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